Lesson 1

Bokap Meaning In Indonesian

Halo semuanya? Apa kabar? Ketemu lagi sama gue, Iman Prabawa. Today, I'm going to talk about the meaning of [bokap] in bahasa Indonesia. As usual, we are going to be looking at examples from movies, YouTube videos, comics, and others where the word [bokap] is used by Indonesians.

Bokap Meaning In Indonesian Language

If you have any questions regarding the Indonesian language, you can ask me directly. You can see how to do that on my About Me page. 

If you are a beginner in the Indonesian language, you can learn step by step with My Lesson Here.

So, let's dive in!

Bokap In Indonesian

Bokap is an informal word in the Indonesian language, and it means father. You will hear this word being spoken a lot in daily conversation, especially in Jakarta.

You will never find this word in formal writing, so don't use it if you're going to write a formal writing in bahasa Indonesia.

How to Pronounce Bokap

Here is how you pronounce [bokap] in bahasa Indonesia.


Next, let's see some example sentences using the word [bokap].

Example Sentences Using Bokap

Here are three example sentences using the word [bokap].

The first example sentence is below.
1. Bokap loe ada di rumah ngga? (Is your father at home?)
And below is how you pronounce it.


The second example sentence is below.
2. Sebentar ya, gue mau nelpon bokap gue dulu. (Just a sec. I'm just gonna call my father.)
And below is how you pronounce it.


The third example sentence is below.
3. Bokap loe kerja di mana, bro? (Where does your father work, bro?)
And below is how you pronounce it.


Next, we will see examples from movies, videos, comics, and whatnot where the word [bokap] is spoken.

Examples of Bokap In Use

The first example is taken from a movie called Ada Apa Dengan Cinta 1 (2002). Let's watch the scene below.


The conversation in the scene with English translation is as follows.

Alya: Tapi bokap gue berantem sama nyokap, Cinta. Bukan sama gue. (But my father who had a fight with my mother, Cinta. And not with me.)

Cinta: Tapi kan loe udah sering banget jadi korban kaya gini, Al. (But you are the one who always becomes the victim.)

Alya: Gimana sih gue mesti ngejelasin ke elo semua? Terserah ya, sekarang lo mau percaya apa engga, bokap gue kalo udah.. kalo udah ngamuk kaya gitu. Kek orang ngga sadar, tau ngga? Habis ngamuk dia bisa nangis kaya anak kecil, nyesel abis, nyiumin kaki nyokap gue, melukin gue. (How should I explain this to you? I don't know whether you would want to believe me or not—My father, when he was in a state of madness like that, was like, in a trance mode, you know that? After running amok like that, suddenly he could cry like a child and regretted all the things he had done, kissing my mother's feet, and then hugged me.)

Let's learn vocabulary from the scene above.

Vocabulary From the Scene

[Gue] = [gua] means I. It's an informal word used mostly by Jakartans and the people who live in its surrounding cities. For more about this, you can read this article, Gue in the Indonesian Language.

[Berantem] is the colloquial way of saying [berkelahi] = having a fight.

[Loe] = [lo] = [elo] = [lu] means you. [Loe] and [gue] are usually used in pairs. For more about this, you can read this article, Loe in the Indonesian Language.

[Udah] is short for [sudah]. In conversational Indonesian, usually, people are pronouncing it [udah] instead of [sudah]. [Sudah] is more formal.

[Sering banget] = [sering sekali] = very often. [Banget] is used a lot in informal or daily conversation. [Banget] means very.

[Ngejelasin] is the colloquial way of saying [menjelaskan = me+jelas+kan] = to explain.

[Ngamuk] is a state in which someone is very angry.

[Nangis] is the colloquial way of saying [menangis = me+tangis] = to cry.

[Nyiumin] is the colloquial way of saying [menciumi = me+cium+i] = to kiss repeatedly.

[Melukin] is the colloquial way of saying [memeluki = me+peluk+i] = to hug.

[Nyesel] is the colloquial way of saying [menyesal = me+sesal] = to regret.

[Kaya] = [kek] = like.

[Tau] = [tahu] = know.

[Kalo] = [kalau] = if.

[Nyesel abis] = to regret something one's has done deeply.


The second example is from a movie called Cek Toko Sebelah, The Series, Season 1, Episode 4 (2018). Let's watch the scene down below.


For conversational from the clip above with vocabulary explanations, you can read my article here: Biasa Aja In Indonesian.


The third example is from a movie called Generasi Micin (2018). Let's watch the scene down below.



The conversation in the scene with English translation is as follows.

Kevin: Akhirnya, bokap mewujudkan cita-citanya. Punya toko sendiri. (Finally, my father achieved his dream. To have his own store.)

Customer: Bisa lah? (Come on?)

Kevin's Father: Ngga bisa! (No!)

Customer: Kan udah sering ke sini? (I often buy in here.)

Kevin's Father: Ngga bisa! (No!)

Kevin: Mengumpulkan cuan demi cuan. (Collecting cent after cent.)

Let's learn vocabulary from the scene.

Vocabulary From the Scene

[Akhirnya] = finally.

[Sering] = often.

[Mengumpulkan = me+kumpul+kan] = to collect something.

[Cuan] = money.


The fourth example is taken from a movie called Sin (2019). Let's watch the clip below.


The conversation from the scene above with English translations is as follows.

Raga: Loe kenapa ngga tinggal sama nyokap loe aja sih? Ngga deket? (Why don't you live with your mother? You’re not close with her?)

Metta: Deket. (We’re close.)

Raga: Bokap? (Your father?)

Metta: Gue ngga kenal sama bokap gue. (I don’t know who my father is.)

Raga: Terkadang lebih enak kaya gitu. (Sometimes it is better that way.)

Let's learn vocabulary from the scene above.

Vocabulary From the Scene

[Kenapa] = why.

[Tinggal] = to live, to stay.

[Sih] is a phatic expression that is used a lot in the Indonesian language. For more about this, you can read this article, Sih in the Indonesian Language.

[Deket] is the way people speak conversational Indonesian. It is informal for [dekat] = close.

[Terkadang] = sometimes.

[Enak] = delicious, but in this context, it means better.


The fifth example is taken from Bang Mpin's YouTube Channel. Let's watch the clip below.


Below is the conversation from the clip with English translations.

Bang Mpin: Awalnya keliling atau emang udah mangkal? Atau? (You start selling this satay by going around, or do you stay? Or else?)

Tukang Sate: Kalo jaman bokap itu keliling. Baru mangkal, habis mangkal itu baru di situ..(*inaudible). (My father started this by going around. After that, he stays. After that, he starts to... (*inaudible).)

Bang Mpin: Tapi dulu bokap keliling, ye? Kelilingnya sekitaran-sekitaran sini? (Your father is selling satay by going around, right? Going around the block here?)

Tukang Sate: Keliling dulu. Jamannya pikulan dulu. (Back then, he went around selling satay. At that time, he carried on his shoulder.)

Bang Mpin: Ooo. Kek gini bang, ya? Kaya baju saya? (I see. Like this? Just like the picture on my shirt here?)

Tukang Sate: Nah, iya bener! (Yeah, just like that!)

Bang Mpin: Nah, yoi! (Oh yeah!)

Let's learn the vocabulary used in this short clip.

Vocabulary From the Clip

[Awalnya] = at first, from the start.

[Keliling] is not staying in one place.

[Mangkal] is selling something by staying in one place.

[Atau] = or.

[Kalo] is informal for [kalau] = if.

[Baru] = new, after that.

[Tukang sate] is someone we called selling satay on the street.

[Sekitaran-sekitaran] = around (some place).

[Sini] = here. For more about this, you can read my article here, Sini In Indonesian.

[Pikulan] is something that you carry on your shoulder. [Sate pikulan] means satay sold by a person who carries the cart on their shoulder, like in this picture below.

Pikulan

[Kek] = [kaya] = like.

[Nah] is used when you agree with what someone says.

[Bener] is informal for [benar] = correct, true.

     Read also: Spada Meaning In Indonesian

So, I think that's all for now. If you have any questions regarding this topic, just leave them in the comment section below, and I'll be happy to answer your questions. And if I find another scene where this word [bokap] is spoken, Insha Allah, I will update this article again. So, bye now.

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