Sebelas Duabelas Meaning In Indonesian

Nyokap In the Indonesian Language

Halo semuanya. Apa kabar? Ketemu lagi dengan saya, Iman Prabawa. This time, I want to talk to you about the meaning of [nyokap] in the Indonesian language. As always, we will watch scenes from movies, talk shows, youtube videos, and whatnot where the word [nyokap] is spoken.

Nyokap In the Indonesian Language

If you want to ask me about a specific topic or have difficulties with something in the Indonesian language, you can just ask me. You can check it out on the About Me page how you can ask me.

     Read also: Bokap in the Indonesian Language

So, without further ado, let's talk about this. 


Meaning of Nyokap in the Indonesian Language

[Nyokap] means mother. This is a slang term, or in Bahasa Indonesia, we call it as Bahasa Gaul. Synonyms for [nyokap] are [ibu], [bunda], [mamah], [mami], [mama], and [mamak].

[Nyokap] is used in daily conversations, especially in Jakarta and the surrounding cities.


How to Pronounce Nyokap

Here is how to pronounce [nyokap]. Let's hear it below.

Next, we will watch scenes from movies, youtube videos, and whatnot, where the word [nyokap] is spoken.


Examples of Nyokap In Use

In this section, I will gather examples from movies, videos, comics, and whatnot that I found where the word [nyokap] is spoken

The first clip is taken from a movie called Susah Sinyal. Let's watch the clip down below.


Conversation in the scene with English translations is as follows.

Jessie: By the way, loe ikut audisi gitu, udah ijin nyokap? (By the way, have you asked for permission from your mother that you are going in for an audition?)

Kiara: Emang perlu? (Why should I?)

In this scene, Kiara wanted to take part in a singing competition, and she has made a video where she sings. She shows the video to her friend, Jessie.

Vocabulary From the Scene

[Loe] is the colloquial way of saying [kamu]. [Loe] means you. Usually used by Jakartan people.

[Ikut] = join, take part, participate.

[Udah] is the colloquial way of saying [sudah]. In daily conversation, we usually drop letters when speaking. As you can see in this scene, she dropped [s] in the word [sudah] and just said it [udah] instead of [sudah].

[Emang] is the colloquial way of saying [memang]. [Emang] is usually when you want to form a question? For example: 
1. Emang boleh? (Is it okay?)
2. Emang kalian mau ke mana? (Actually, where are you guys headed to?)


The second clip is taken from a movie called Generasi Micin. Let's watch the clip down below.


Conversation from the scene with English translations is as follows.

Guru: Bagus! Betul semua. Yenny memang murid yang pintar. (Good job! All are correct! Yenny is indeed a smart student!)  

Kevin: Yang ini nyokap. Yenny Hwang. Sebelum berubah jadi Yenny Anggara pastinya. (This is my mother. Yenny Hwang. This, before she changed her name to Yenny Anggara, for sure.)

In this scene, Kevin showed a cut scene of her mom when she was young. She was a smart student back in the day.

Vocabulary From the Scene

[Bagus] = good.

[Memang] = indeed. [Memang] in this sentence is just to emphasize that Yenny is really a smart student.

[Murid] = student.

[Pintar] = smart.

[Yang ini...] is usually used when you want to introduce something or you want to let someone know about something. It's like [this one is..] in English.

[Berubah] = changed, turn into something.

[Pastinya] in this sentence has no meaning. It functions just to emphasize. It's like [for sure] in English.
The third clip is taken from a movie called Sin (2019). Let's watch the clip down below.


Conversation from the scene with English translations is as follows.

Metta: Minggu depan, nyokap gue ulang tahun. Temenin gue, ya? (Next week is my mother's birthday. You come with me, okay?)

Raga: Terserah. (Okay.)

In this scene, Metta asked Raga to come with her celebrating her mother's birthday.

Vocabulary From the Scene

[Ulang tahun] = birthday.

[Gue] is informal for [saya] = I. For more about this, you can read this article, Gue in the Indonesian Language.

[Temenin] is the colloquial way of saying [temani]. When you say "temenin gue" to your friend, it means that you want your friend to accompany you to someplace or somewhere.

[Terserah] means that you will agree with what your friend has to make. But sometimes [terserah] can also mean [whatever]. The intonation plays an important role here.

So, I think this is all for now. If I find another scene where the word [nyokap] is spoken, Insha Allah, I will update this article again. 

If you have any questions, just leave them in the comment section down below, and I'll be happy to answer them. Thanks for reading my article, and I'll talk to you soon. Bye now.

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