Sebelas Duabelas Meaning In Indonesian

I Have a Flat Tire In Bahasa

Halo semuanya. Apa kabar? Ketemu lagi dengan saya, Iman Prabawa. In this article, I want to talk to you about how to say [I have a flat tire] in Indonesian. As always, we will watch examples, mostly from movies where the phrase is spoken by the Indonesians. 

I Have a Flat Tire In Bahasa

If you want to ask me about a specific topic or have difficulties with something in the Indonesian language, you can just ask me. You can check it out on the About Me page.

     Read also: How to Say How Old Are You In Bahasa

Okay, let's dive right in.


How to Say I Have a Flat Tire In Indonesian

To say [I have a flat tire] in the Indonesian language, you can say this.

Ban saya bocor.

And here is how you pronounce it.

And you can also say this.

Ban saya kempes.

And here is how you pronounce it.

And then you can change [saya] into [kamu] to make it more informal. It becomes.

Ban aku bocor.

And here is how you pronounce it.

And you can also say.

Ban aku kempes.

And here is how you pronounce it.

And then, you can change [aku] into [gue]. [Gue] is usually used by the people of Jakarta and its surrounding cities. 

Ban gue bocor.

And here is how you pronounce it.

And you can also say.

Ban gue kempes.

And here is how you pronounce it.

If you want to explain more, for example, what [ban] is this which [kempes] or becomes flat. You can add [mobil] for car, [motor] for motorbike, and [sepeda] for bicycle after the word [ban].

For example, this. 

Ban mobil gue kempes.

For others, you just change [mobil] into other vehicles. And here is how you pronounce it.

Next, we will watch examples from movies where Indonesian people say [I have a flat tire].


Examples From Movies

The first scene we are about to watch is taken from the movie Garis Waktu (2022). Let's watch the clip below.


Below is the conversation from the scene with English translations.

April: Nya, aduh sori banget nih kayanya gue bakalan telat deh jemput lo. Ban mobil gue tiba-tiba bocor. Lo ngga papa kan nunggu? (Nya, I'm really sorry. I think I'm gonna be late to pick you up on time.)

Sanya: Aduh, ya elah, santai kali. Loe kaya ngga tau gue aja. (Hey, you know me. It's okay with me. Just relax.)

April: Mana di sini ngga ada apa-apa lagi. Sumpah gue bingung harus ngapain. (You know what? There's nothing here. I really don't know what to do right now.)

Sanya: Mendingan loe ganti deh, pake ban serep. Coba dicek di belakang tuh. Pasti ada. (I think you better change the tire, use the spare tire. Check on your trunk. It's got to be there somewhere.)

April: Ya, ngga segampang itu lah. Ya pikir aja. (It's not that easy, you know?)

A Stranger: Kenapa, mba? (What's wrong, miss?)

April: Ee, kempes nih. (I got a flat tire.)

In the scene above, April has just got a flat tire on the way to her friend, Sanya. She calls Sanya to let her know that she is going to be late because of the flat tire.

Here, April says this.

Ban mobil gue tiba-tiba bocor.

She uses the word [mobil] after the word [ban] to explain what kind of [ban] it is. [Tiba-tiba] means all of sudden, or it just happens suddenly, unexpectedly. 

When a stranger comes and asks what happened to her, April says this.

Kempes nih.

The full sentence for this would be.

Ban saya kempes nih.

[Nih] is just to emphasize that she got a flat tire. You can just omit the word [nih], and the meaning doesn't change at all. She just said [kempes nih] and omitted [ban saya] because the person she talks to already knows that it is the tire that goes flat.


Vocabulary From the Scene

[Aduh] here is just a filler word that you can omit. Literally, [aduh] is used when you are in pain.

[Banget] = [sekali] = very. [Banget] is used more often in daily conversations than [sekali].

[Bakalan] is the colloquial way of saying [akan] = will.

[Telat] = late.

[Gue] and [loe] are used in Jakarta when talking to your friends. [Gue] = I, and [loe] = you. For more about this, you can read my article, Lo Meaning In Bahasa, and Gue Meaning In Bahasa.

[Loe ngga papa kan (something something)?] is usually used when you want to make an excuse about something. It's like saying, "Is it okay with you if (something something)?]

[Nunggu] comes from the word [menunggu], and here, April omits the syllable [me] and just says it [nunggu], which means to wait.

[Ya elah, santai kali] is used when you are really not bothered with something that just happened.

[Loe kaya ngga tahu gue aja] literally would be translated as [it's like you don't know me]. It is used to emphasize that it is okay and it is not bothering you at all. April apologizes that she is going to be late because of the flat tire, and Sanya says this to make sure that it is okay with her.

[Mana di sini ngga ada apa-apa lagi] <--- in this sentence the word [mana] and [lagi] you can just omit it. [Mana] and [lagi] here are just to emphasize that April was really upset because her tire went flat in a place where there is nobody at all. [Mana] literally means where, and [lagi] literally means again.

[Sumpah gue bingung harus ngapain] <--- [sumpah] in this sentence is just a filler word, you can omit the word. Its function is just to emphasize that April really doesn't know what to do. [Sumpah] literally means, I swear.

[Ngapain] here is the colloquial way of saying [melakukan apa] = what to do. [Sumpah gue bingung harus ngapain] if I make this sentence into a formal sentence, it would become [Saya bingung harus melakukan apa. (I don't know what to do.)]

[Mendingan] is used when you want to give advice to someone. Here, Sanya advised April to change her tire with a spare tire in the trunk. That's why she uses the word [mendingan] before she gives advice. [Mendingan (something something)] = you better do (something something).

[Ban serep] = spare tire.

[Pasti ada] is used when you are really sure that something is there.

[Ya pikir aja] here means that to change the tire herself is not something that is easy to do by her, and she says [ya pikir aja] means that you need to think that it is hard for me to change the tire by myself.

[Mba] is an honorific title used to address older women, but in this case, it is used to address politely a stranger that you meet on the street, like in this example. For more about this, you can read my article, Mba Meaning In Bahasa.

     Read also: How to Say Have You Eaten In Bahasa

So, I guess this wraps up today's article. If I find another example, Insha Allah, I will update this article again. Thank you for reading this article, and I'll see you soon. Bye now.

Comments