Sebelas Duabelas Meaning In Indonesian

Where Are You Going In Bahasa

Halo semuanya, ketemu lagi dengan saya, Iman Prabawa. In this article, we will talk about how to say [where are you going?] in the Indonesian language. As always, we will watch examples from movies where the phrase is spoken by native Indonesians.

Where Are You Going In Bahasa

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     Read also: How to Say Where Are You In Bahasa

So, I guess let's dive right in.


How to Say Where Are You Going In the Indonesian Language

We will learn how to ask [where are you going?] in the Indonesian language, from the very formal to how we say it in daily conversations.

Formally, we will say this.

Anda mau ke mana?

And here is how you pronounce it.

You can switch the order of the words, and it becomes this.

Mau ke mana Anda?

And here is how you pronounce it.

If you want to be more polite, you can change [Anda] with [bapak] if the person you are talking to is an older man and [ibu] if the person you are talking to is an older woman.

Bapak mau ke mana?

And here is how you pronounce it.

You can switch the order of the word [bapak] and put it at the back of the sentence.

Mau ke mana bapak?

And here is how you pronounce it.

Ibu mau ke mana?

And here is how you pronounce it.

And you can put the word [ibu] at the back of the sentence.

Mau ke mana ibu?

And here is how you pronounce it.

Now, let's talk about how you say [where are you going?] in daily conversations. Usually, we will say this.

Kamu mau ke mana?

And here is how you pronounce it.

And you can put the word [kamu] at the back of the sentence.

Mau ke mana kamu?

And here is how you pronounce it.

For a more informal, usually something that is used in Jakarta and its surrounding cities, you change [kamu] into [loe].

Loe mau ke mana?

And here is how you pronounce it.

And you can put [loe] at the back of the sentence.

Mau ke mana loe?

And here is how you pronounce it.

[Loe] can be written as [lu] or [elo] or [lo]. Those are varieties in how the Indonesian people write the word [loe], which means [you] in English. You only use [loe] when you are talking to your friends. Don't use [loe] when you are talking to your boss, your lecturer, your parents, your friend's parents, or people older than you unless you are really close with them, and they usually talk to you using [gue] and [loe].


Examples From Movies

The first scene we are about to watch is taken from a series called Wedding Agreement, Season 1, Episode 1 (2022). Let's watch the scene below.


Below is the conversation from the scene with English translations.

Bian: Sar! Sarah! Sar! Kamu mau ke mana, Sar? Sar, dengerin aku dulu. Kamu dengerin rencana aku dulu, dong! (Sar! Sarah! Sar! Where are you going, Sar? Sar, please listen to me. You need to listen to my plan first.)

Sarah: Apa? Rencana apa? Ha? Udah jelas-jelas kamu mau nikah sama dia, kan? (What? What plan? Huh? You will certainly marry her, right?)

Bian: Kamu tau aku terpaksa, Sar. Plis, dengerin aku dulu, Sar. Plis. Aku mohon. (You know that I have to, Sar. Would you listen to me, please? I'm begging you.)

Sarah: Buat aku, kamu udah ngga ada di dunia ini. Di pikiran aku, kamu udah mati. Tahu ngga? (For me, you no longer exist in this world. In my mind, you are already dead. You know that?)

In this scene, Bian asks where Sarah is going by saying this sentence.
Kamu mau ke mana, Sar?
They are lovers, so usually in Jakarta, they usually use [aku] and [kamu] when they talk to each other. They would use [gue] and [loe] if they were friends.

Vocabulary From the Scene

[Dengerin] is the colloquial way of saying [dengarkan]. When you want someone to listen to you, then you say [dengarkan] or [dengerin].

[Aku] is informal for [saya] = I.

[Dengerin aku dulu] is used when you want somebody to first listen to you because you have something to explain.

[Rencana] = plan.

[Tau] is informal for [tahu] = know. 

[Apa] = what.

[Udah jelas-jelas] is used when you know something that is very obvious. For example, you know that your boyfriend cheated on you, and you saw it with your own eyes, and then you can say, "Udah jelas-jelas kamu selingkuh (it is very obvious that you cheated on me)." In this scene, Bian is going to marry a person set up by his mom and not by his own will, and he can not do something about it. And Sarah, his girlfriend, knows about that. That's why she says, "Udah jelas-jelas kamu mau nikah sama dia, kan? (It is very obvious that you are going to marry her, right?)."

[Terpaksa] is a state where you have to do something, and you can not refuse it because someone who orders you to do that has a higher level than you. So, you can't do something about it. You just have to do it. In this case, Bian's mother sets him up to marry a woman who, in fact, he doesn't love, but his mother wants him to marry her. So, because it's his mother's will, he can not do something about it. He just has to obey her.

[Plis] comes from the English word [please], and usually, this is how Indonesian people write it and make it an Indonesian word.

[Aku mohon] is said when you are begging someone. In this scene, Bian begs Sarah to listen to his explanation.

[Buat aku] = for me.

[Udah] is a common reduction for [sudah] = already.

[Ngga ada] = something that is not available but, in this case, no longer exists.

[Dunia] = world.

[Mati] = dead.


The second example is taken from a movie called Garis Waktu (2022). Let's watch the scene below.


For the conversation from the scene with English translations and also the explanation of the vocabulary used in the scene above, you can read my article, Apa-apaan Ini Meaning In Bahasa.

In this scene, April's father says,
Mau ke mana kamu?
Just like what I explained above in number 8 of the way to say 'where are you?' in Bahasa.

     Read also: Bucin Meaning In Bahasa

So, I guess this is all for now. If I find another example, Insha Allah, I will update this article again. Thank you for reading my article, and I'll see you soon. Bye now.

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